Addressing Misconceptions About The Dakota Access Pipeline

Map of the Dakota Access Pipeline on private land

There are a number of misconceptions and myths about the Dakota Access Pipeline Project. Unfortunately, a number of media outlets, bloggers, opinion writers, and social media accounts have spread a number of similar misconceptions. Here are the facts.

  • The Dakota Access is one of the most technologically advanced and safest pipelines ever built. It is entirely underground and surpasses federal safety requirements.
  • The pipeline does not encroach or cross any land owned by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.
  • The Dakota Access Pipeline is entirely underground and will cross under Lake Oahe at a minimum depth of 95 feet below the riverbed.
  • The Dakota Access Pipeline does not endanger water; the Standing Rock Sioux water inlet by early 2017 will be moved to a location more than 70 miles away from the pipeline.
  • The majority of protesters are not there to protect water, as they claim, but are actually extremists opposed to any and all use of fossil fuels.

Notably, by contrast, rail cars transporting crude oil from wells owned by Native American Tribes currently cross the Standing Rock Sioux reservation without objection.

Lake Oahe, the final portion of the pipeline’s path to be constructed is also home to eight pipelines.

Many of the protesters on-site are not Standing Rock Sioux, but outsiders with a different more extremist agenda that is simply opposed to the use of all fossil fuels. They have provoked multiple dangerous and criminal confrontations with law enforcement, and caused significant damage to property, which have led local agencies to ask for extra federal help.

More Here: https://daplpipelinefacts.com/common-misconceptions/

The Tax System Explained…With Beer

Suppose that every day, ten men go out for beer and the bill for all ten comes to $100.

If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this:
* The first four men (the poorest) would pay nothing.
* The fifth would pay $1.
* The sixth would pay $3.
* The seventh would pay $7.
* The eighth would pay $12.
* The ninth would pay $18.
* The tenth man (the richest) would pay $59.

So, that’s what they decided to do.

The ten men drank in the bar every day and seemed quite happy with the arrangement, until one day, the owner threw them a curve.

‘Since you are all such good customers,’ he said, ‘I’m going to reduce the cost of your daily beer by $20.’ Drinks for the ten now cost just $80.’

The group still wanted to pay their bill the way we pay our taxes so the first four men were unaffected. They would still drink for free. But what about the other six men – the paying customers? How could they divide the $20 windfall so that everyone would get his ‘fair share?’

They realized that $20 divided by six is $3.33. But if they subtracted that from everybody’s share, then the fifth man and the sixth man would each end up being paid to drink his beer. So, the bar owner suggested that it would be fair to reduce each man’s bill by roughly the same amount, and he proceeded to work out the amounts each should pay.

And so:

* The fifth man, like the first four, now paid nothing (100% savings).
* The sixth now paid $2 instead of $3 (33%savings) .
* The seventh now pay $5 instead of $7 (28%savings) .
* The eighth now paid $9 instead of $12 ( 25% savings).
* The ninth now paid $14 instead of $18 ( 22% savings).
* The tenth now paid $49 instead of $59 (16% savings).

Each of the six was better off than before. And the first four continued to drink for free. But once outside the restaurant, the men began to compare their savings.

‘I only got a dollar out of the $20,’ declared the sixth man. He pointed to the tenth man, ‘but he got $10!’

‘Yeah, that’s right,’ exclaimed the fifth man. ‘I only saved a dollar,too. It’s unfair that he got ten times more than I!’

‘That’s true!!’ shouted the seventh man. ‘Why should he get $10 back when I got only two? The wealthy get all the breaks!’

‘Wait a minute,’ yelled the first four men in unison. ‘We didn’t get anything at all. The system exploits the poor!’

The nine men surrounded the tenth and beat him up.

The next night the tenth man didn’t show up for drinks, so the nine sat down and had beers without him. But when it came time to pay the bill, they discovered something important. They didn’t have enough money between all of them for even half of the bill!

And that, boys and girls, journalists and college professors, is how our tax system works. The people who pay the highest taxes get the most benefit from a tax reduction. Tax them too much, attack them for being wealthy, and they just may not show up anymore. In fact, they might start drinking overseas where the atmosphere is somewhat friendlier.

For those who understand, no explanation is needed.

cara ellison

Do You Really Need To Be Told?

Hat Creek/Pit River Fire June 2008

Hat Creek/Pit River Fire June 2008

How much money do we, the taxpayers, have to spend on dumb people? If you can’t figure out it’s smokey outside when the whole forest around you is burning, maybe you shouldn’t be allowed to live unsupervised.

And just how much is this costing me to move in equipment to tell me the obvious?

A pair of air sensors are now monitoring the air in Eastern Shasta County near ongoing wildfires.

Information from the air monitors is available at the Shasta County Air Quality Management’s Web site at www.co.shasta.ca.us/html/ResMgmt/AQ/aq_map.aspx.

Scroll the map to Burney and Fall River Mills to see readings from the temporary monitors.

After a story in the Record Searchlight and on Redding.com Thursday, the state Air Resources Board hauled the monitors to the Intermountain Area to augment the county’s permanent monitor in Anderson, which wasn’t monitoring pollutants from the fires because they were too far away. That monitor is the only one of the three maintained by the county that gauges particulate pollution, such as ash put off by wildfires.

This afternoon the Burney monitor showed good air quality and the Fall River Mills monitor indicated unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups. Source

I am so sick of this Nanny State bullshit I can’t even put it in words. If there’s miles of forest burning in your immediate area, do you really have to be told the air quality might be bad?


Duh-1 Mocks TEA Parties and Fox News !Update! Dennis Miller Responds

Yuk it up funny man. It’s all rainbows and unicorns in Liberal Land right now.You mock the TEA Parties at your own risk. There is a storm brewing that you apparently choose to ignore and make fun of, and it’s heading towards Liberal Land. Your arrogance will be your downfall.

!!UPDATE!! Dennis Miller conveys my feelings perfectly. !!UPDATE!!


Just Words, Just Speeches, Just Lies

7 Broken Promises:
1. Make Government Open and Transparent
2. Make it “Impossible” for Congressmen to slip in Pork Barrel Projects
3. Meetings where laws are written will be more open to the public (republicans shut out)
4. No more secrecy
5. Public will have 5 days to look at a Bill
6. You’ll know what’s in it (Republican Senators didnt know)
7. We will put every pork barrel project online

H/T Sweetness & Light

As I Was Saying, It Has To Be Done (but stand by for an update)

Not everyone is happy about the bailout of corporate America, but they seem to agree it has to be done. As I said in a previous post, it stinks but it has to be done. It seems I’m not alone.

John Boehner: It’s a crap sandwich

In a closed-door session with House Republicans, Minority Leader John A. Boehner just called the financial rescue deal a “crap sandwich” – then said he’ll vote for it when it comes to the floor Monday.

House Republicans are the key to the bill’s passage – Speaker Nancy Pelosi said earlier today that it’s a “bipartisan” bill and will need “bipartisanship” to pass – and it now appears that a substantial number of them will put cast their votes in favor of it.

According to a source in the room, the plan has so far won endorsements from Minority Whip Roy Blunt, who negotiated it on behalf of the House Republicans; Eric Cantor, the chief deputy whip; and Paul Ryan, a hard-core conservative from Wisconsin who may hold more sway with conservatives on this issue than any other member of the House.

But like Boehner, Ryan wasn’t exactly happy about how things have unfolded. Referring to the situation facing the country – and not the bill itself – Ryan said, “This sucks.”

Politico

Paul Ryan: It sucks

House Republicans are talking about the new bill right now behind closed doors.

I’m told by someone in the room that Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., ranking Republican on the House Budget Committee and an admired conservative within his caucus, just made what I’m told was a credible argument FOR the bill.

Said Ryan of the bill: “It sucks.”

But, he said, it has to pass to preserve the free market system and stave off a financial collapse.

That’s a very good sign for its passage — Ryan was one of the leading opponents of the bill just a few days ago.

Here’s the latest version of the bill, if you want to read it.

ABC News

Newt Gingrich: Reluctantly I would vote yes

H/T Hot Air on all links.

Although…. I don’t understand why the Dems need the GOP votes. They have the majority in both houses, and the support of the White House. Must be some politics involved there. 😯

!!HERE’S THE UPDATE!!:

I’ve been listening to Rush today, and he makes a lot of sense. He, Michelle Malkin, Laura Ingram, Sean Hannity and others have pointed out many errors in my jugement. Here’s Rush’s take on this.

The Bailout: We Have A Deal??

Not until it’s signed, sealed and delivered. Who knows what could happen next, but the signs are encouraging, if you call corporate welfare encouraging. I know it has to be done, but it still stinks.

Congressional leaders and the Bush administration reached a tentative deal early Sunday on a landmark bailout of imperiled financial markets whose collapse could plunge the nation into a deep recession.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the $700 billion accord just after midnight but said it still has to be put on paper.

“We’ve still got more to do to finalize it, but I think we’re there,” said Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, who also participated in the negotiations in the Capitol.

“We worked out everything,” said Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H., the chief Senate Republican in the talks.

Congressional leaders hope to have the House vote on the measure Monday. A Senate vote would come later.

Read it all HERE.

Ed Morrissey at Hot Air has an update that says the ACORN slush fund has been dropped from the deal.

The funding of the Housing Trust Fund, the slush fund that feeds ACORN and La Raza, is out.  You can thank House Republicans for enough obstructionism to get that result.  Other changes made to the final version of the bailout, according to a source on the Hill, were the removal of several provisions:

  • Provision to provide unions and other activist groups with proxy access for corporate boards
  • Provision to mandate shareholder votes on compensation issues (union priority)
  • Diversion of funds into a housing fund to support left-wing activist groups like ACORN
  • A provision to allow trial judges to arbitrarily adjust mortgages, creating bonanza for trial lawyers
  • A provision to require the government to sell to state and local governments at a discount homes the government acquires as a result of foreclosure

It also suspends mark-to-market rules and requires a study on their effects on the collapse.

Update II: Just to clarify, the bullet points are items removed from the plan.  Sorry; it was very unclear.


And you need to read Michelle Malkin’s view of this.

Myth vs. Fact at Hot Air.

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