Explore The Great State of Jefferson

I just came across this nifty little publication. It has monthly news pdf’s going back 3 years. I only skimmed one of them before deciding to post this for anyone interested in my neck of the woods. Jefferson Backroads

Jefferson Backroads is a happy little publication overflowing with interesting stories telling the amazing history of the charming small towns in our Rural American region as well as current stories about upcoming events and many amazing Mom & Pop businesses operating here today. You can find our paper publications each month in many quality locations throughout Siskiyou County and also in many happy spots to the north – south – east & west.

Click on the links below to catch up on our monthly publications ONLINE 24/7/365. It does take a few moments for them to download but I promise it is WELL worth the Wait! You will see LOTS of our local businesses, upcoming events and a lot of interesting local history! Lots of FUN INFO! We hope you enjoy reading our Jefferson Backroads Publications!

Jefferson Backroads

Also visit their Facebook page HERE


Happy 237th Birthday USMC

A repost from a few years ago. It’s a favorite of mine.

The Few, The Proud

History of The Marines’ Hymn: (exerpt from Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines, Copyright 2001 Marion F. Sturkey) The U.S. Army, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Air Force all have their own songs.

For the U.S. Navy, Anchors Aweigh was written in 1906 by Lt. Charles Zimmerman and midshipman Alfred Miles. Initially the song was a tribute to the Naval Academy Class of 1907. Various people revised it later, trying to weed out the nonsense. Another midshipman, Royal Lovell, penned the final stanza in 1926. Anchors Aweigh has a snappy little tune, but no one knows what the words imply. The original first stanza in 1906 had dealt solely with the game of football. Even today, the song offers a bittersweet “farewell to college joys.” The lyrics end by “wishing you a happy voyage home.” Many musical experts think that Anchors Aweigh is a ballad for football players who like sailboats. But, no one really knows for sure.
The U.S. Army adopted a snazzy tune for The Caisson Song. Unlike the words in the Navy’s song, the words of the Army’s song make sense. According to the words of each stanza, The Caisson Song clearly is a melody for rural motorists. Edmund Gruber wrote the original lyrics in the Philippines during World War I. Naturally, since most of the fighting was 8000 miles away in Europe, Gruber made only a passing reference to warfare. Yet, he was careful to be “politically correct.” He apparently sought the help of first grade students in composing the lyrics. The banal “Hi, hi, hee” is a dead giveaway. No one has a clue as to what it might mean. Still, at least it rhymes.
The U.S. Air Force did not exist in 1938. But, that year Liberty Magazine sponsored a contest for an official song for the Army Air Corps. The magazine received 757 entries. A group of Army Air Corps wives (yes, believe it or not, wives) selected the entry from Robert Crawford, Off We Go into the Wild Blue Yonder.
After World War II the Army Air Corps evolved into the U.S. Air Force. This fledgling flying club adopted Off We Go’ as their official song. It suited the illusionary nature of the new Wild-Blue-Yonder-Wonders with references to “those who love the vastness of the sky” and the fictitious “rainbow’s pot of gold.” The final stanza speaks of the “gray haired wonder,” an admirable gesture of non-discrimination for the new civilianized Air Force.
These three songs, Anchors Aweigh, The Caisson Song, and Off We Go into the Wild Blue Yonder, are often played at public events. They obviously delight the members and advocates of the affected service: Navy, Army, or Air Force. When their song is played, sailors, soldiers, and zoomies leap to their feet and shout, cheer, clap their hands, and jive with the music. They have a jolly time, almost like a high school pep rally.

The U.S. Marine Corps is the United States’ military band of brothers dedicated to warfighting. The proud Brotherhood of Marines is guided by principles, values, virtues, love of country, and its Warrior Culture. This brotherhood of American Patriots has no song. Instead, Marine Warriors have a hymn. When The Marines’ Hymn is played, United States Marines stand at attention. They silently show their pride in their fellow Marines, their Corps, their Country, their heritage, and their hymn.
The Marines’ Hymn is a tribute to Warriors. Marine Warriors stormed fortress Derna, raised the American flag, and gave us “the shores of Tripoli.” Marines fought their way into the castle at Chapultepec and gave us the “halls of Montezuma.” Marines exist for the purpose of warfighting. Fighting is their role in life. They “fight for right and freedom” and “to keep our honor clean.” They fight “in the air, on land, and sea.” The Marine Corps is Valhalla for Warriors. U.S. Marines need no song. They have a hymn.
Ironically, no one knows who wrote the hymn, which was in widespread use by the mid-1800s. Col. A.S. McLemore, USMC, spent several years trying to identify the origin of the tune. In 1878 he told the leader of the Marine Band that the tune had been adopted from the comic opera Genevieve de Barbant, by Jaques Offenback. Yet, others believe the tune originated from a Spanish folk song. Whatever! Regardless of its origin, The Marines’ Hymn has remained a revered icon of the United States Marine Corps for almost 200 years.
In 1929 The Marines’ Hymn became the official hymn of the Corps. Thirteen years later in November 1942 the Commandant approved a change in the words of the first verse, fourth line. Because of the increasing use of aircraft in the Corps, the words were changed to “In the air, on land, and sea.” No other changes have been made since that time. When you have attained absolute perfection, there is no need for further modification:

From the Halls of Montezuma,
To the Shores of Tripoli;
We fight our country’s battles
In the air, on land, and sea;
First to fight for right and freedom
And to keep our honor clean;
We are proud to claim the title

Our flag’s unfurled to every breeze,
From dawn to setting sun;
We have fought in every clime and place
Where we could take a gun;
In the snow of far off northern lands
And in sunny tropic scenes;
You will find us always on the job –

Here’s health to you and to our Corps
Which we are proud to serve;
In many a strife we’ve fought for life
And never lost our nerve;
If the Army and the Navy
Ever look on Heaven’s scenes;
They will find the streets are guarded

Sir Winston Churchill, British Prime Minister, became an ardent admirer of the U.S. Marine Corps. In the company of guests of state, he often demonstrated his respect for U.S. Marines by reciting, from memory, all three verses of The Marines’ Hymn.

I heard a lot about the Marines growing up. I heard these lyrics and a lot more. My dad is a former Marine, guarding those streets in heaven. Semper Fi Dad.

The History of The Global Warming Scam

John Coleman has published the best history of the Global Warming Scam I have ever seen. Here are a few excerpts. Be sure to read it all at the link below.

The story begins with an Oceanographer named Roger Revelle. He served with the Navy in World War II. After the war he became the Director of the Scripps Oceanographic Institute in La Jolla in San Diego, California. Revelle saw the opportunity to obtain major funding from the Navy for doing measurements and research on the ocean around the Pacific Atolls where the US military was conducting atomic bomb tests. He greatly expanded the Institute’s areas of interest and among others hired Hans Suess, a noted Chemist from the University of Chicago, who was very interested in the traces of carbon in the environment from the burning of fossil fuels. Revelle tagged on to Suess studies and co-authored a paper with him in 1957. The paper raises the possibility that the carbon dioxide might be creating a greenhouse effect and causing atmospheric warming. It seems to be a plea for funding for more studies. Funding, frankly, is where Revelle’s mind was most of the time.


Now let me take you back to the1950s when this was going on. Our cities were entrapped in a pall of pollution from the crude internal combustion engines that powered cars and trucks back then and from the uncontrolled emissions from power plants and factories. Cars and factories and power plants were filling the air with all sorts of pollutants. There was a valid and serious concern about the health consequences of this pollution and a strong environmental movement was developing to demand action. Government accepted this challenge and new environmental standards were set. Scientists and engineers came to the rescue. New reformulated fuels were developed for cars, as were new high tech, computer controlled engines and catalytic converters. By the mid seventies cars were no longer big time polluters, emitting only some carbon dioxide and water vapor from their tail pipes. Likewise, new fuel processing and smoke stack scrubbers were added to industrial and power plants and their emissions were greatly reduced, as well.

But an environmental movement had been established and its funding and very existence depended on having a continuing crisis issue. So the research papers from Scripps came at just the right moment. And, with them came the birth of an issue; man-made global warming from the carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels.

Revelle and Keeling used this new alarmism to keep their funding growing. Other researchers with environmental motivations and a hunger for funding saw this developing and climbed aboard as well. The research grants began to flow and alarming hypothesis began to show up everywhere.


He left Scripps finally in 1963 and moved to Harvard University to establish a Center for Population Studies. It was there that Revelle inspired one of his students to become a major global warming activist. This student would say later, “It felt like such a privilege to be able to hear about the readouts from some of those measurements in a group of no more than a dozen undergraduates. Here was this teacher presenting something not years old but fresh out of the lab, with profound implications for our future!” The student described him as “a wonderful, visionary professor” who was “one of the first people in the academic community to sound the alarm on global warming,” That student was Al Gore. He thought of Dr. Revelle as his mentor and referred to him frequently, relaying his experiences as a student in his book Earth in the Balance, published in 1992.

Don’t stop there! You have to read all of this great history lesson. Go HERE for the rest.


Algore: Climate Change Killed Off The Mayans

Must have been all those cars, coal fired electric plants and private jets.

From the Gore Journal.

Yooouuu don't know history.....I do

You, don't know history. I do

A new study suggests the Mayan civilization might have collapsed due to environmental disasters:

“‘These models suggest that as ecosystems were destroyed by mismanagement or were transformed by global climatic shifts, the depletion of agricultural and wild foods eventually contributed to the failure of the Maya sociopolitical system,’ writes environmental archaeologist Kitty Emery of the Florida Museum of Natural History in the current Human Ecology journal.”

As we move towards solving the climate crisis, we need to remember the consequences to civilizations that refused to take environmental concerns seriously.

He finds a quote somewhere, repeats it, and it will become the absolute truth according to Gore.  There is nothing to stop this man now, and he will say anything to further his Global Warming Lies. Even “The One” has fallen under the spell of The Goracle. “The One” Regurgitates…


The Plot Thickens

In 1971 D.B. Cooper hijacked a Boeing 727 and escaped with $200,000 by parachuting out of the back of the plane. He has never been found, dead or alive. But, the latest development puts some new twists into the case.

SEATTLE – The FBI is analyzing a torn, tangled parachute found buried by children in southwest Washington to determine whether it might have been used by famed plane hijacker D.B. Cooper, the agency said Tuesday.

Children playing outside their home near Amboy found the chute’s fabric sticking up from the ground in an area where their father had been grading a road, agent Larry Carr said. They pulled it out as far as they could, then cut the parachute’s ropes with scissors.


The children had seen recent media coverage of the case — the FBI launched a publicity campaign last fall, hoping to generate tips to solve the 36-year-old mystery — and they urged their dad to call the agency.

“When we went to the public, the whole idea was that the public is going to bring the answers to us,” Carr said. “This is exactly what we were hoping for.”

This changes what little evidence has been found since 1971. It could also be totally unrelated.
Read the rest.


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