Addressing Misconceptions About The Dakota Access Pipeline

Map of the Dakota Access Pipeline on private land

There are a number of misconceptions and myths about the Dakota Access Pipeline Project. Unfortunately, a number of media outlets, bloggers, opinion writers, and social media accounts have spread a number of similar misconceptions. Here are the facts.

  • The Dakota Access is one of the most technologically advanced and safest pipelines ever built. It is entirely underground and surpasses federal safety requirements.
  • The pipeline does not encroach or cross any land owned by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.
  • The Dakota Access Pipeline is entirely underground and will cross under Lake Oahe at a minimum depth of 95 feet below the riverbed.
  • The Dakota Access Pipeline does not endanger water; the Standing Rock Sioux water inlet by early 2017 will be moved to a location more than 70 miles away from the pipeline.
  • The majority of protesters are not there to protect water, as they claim, but are actually extremists opposed to any and all use of fossil fuels.

Notably, by contrast, rail cars transporting crude oil from wells owned by Native American Tribes currently cross the Standing Rock Sioux reservation without objection.

Lake Oahe, the final portion of the pipeline’s path to be constructed is also home to eight pipelines.

Many of the protesters on-site are not Standing Rock Sioux, but outsiders with a different more extremist agenda that is simply opposed to the use of all fossil fuels. They have provoked multiple dangerous and criminal confrontations with law enforcement, and caused significant damage to property, which have led local agencies to ask for extra federal help.

More Here: https://daplpipelinefacts.com/common-misconceptions/

It’s just weather, it’s been here before

It’s just weather, it’s all been done before and will repeat again. Not Global Warming, not Climate Change, just normal weather. Here’s a glimpse of two Februaries, 2015 and 1934.

 

 

Climate division rankings for February 2015.

1934 divisional ranking

The rest is at Anthony Watts’ What’s Up With That.

Are The Good Times Over?

Wow, 22 degrees this morning 74 this afternoon. Looks like this pattern will stick around for awhile with no precip in sight. We’ve been in a historical wet period for the last 500 years and it looks like the good times may be over. We are so screwed.

 

a200-yeardrought

 

This is why we don’t believe the “Climate Change” scientists

 

H/T Chicks on the Right

Drought Stricken California Suddenly Green

Some encouraging news compared to last year. From Roy W. Spencer, Ph. D.

Heavy rains over the last few weeks have led to a sudden greening of much of California, as revealed in yesterday’s color satellite image compared to exactly 1 year ago (click for full size):

NASA MODIS imagery of central and northern California on Dec. 23 of 2013 and 2014.
Many stations in Northern California have recorded over 20 inches of rain, and Folsom Dam has received a whopping 62 inches of rain this month. Lake Shasta, the largest reservoir in California, has erased almost half of its deficit below its normal level for this time of year.

Damn It! Almost Missed Earth Hour, TURN ON THOSE LIGHTS!!!

Evil lurks in the dark . Have you ever noticed how rats, cockroaches and druggies scatter when a bit of light is shined in their direction? Turn on those lights folks, and I will start the bonfire in a few minutes…well, maybe in a couple of days after we dry out from the rain, hail, snow.

Thanks for the reminder, Michelle Malkin’s site.

We Didn’t Have “The Green Thing” Back Then

The   Green  Thing

Checking  out at  the store, the young cashier  suggested to the
older woman that she  should bring  her own  grocery bags because
plastic bags weren’t  good  for  the environment.

The woman   apologized and explained, “We didn’t  have  this green
thing back in my earlier  days.”

The clerk   responded, “That’s  our problem today. Your generation did
not care  enough  to save our environment for  future   generations.”

She was right  —  our  generation didn’t have the green thing in  its  day.

Back  then,  we returned milk  bottles, soda bottles and beer  bottles
to the  store. The  store sent them back to the  plant  to be washed
and sterilized and  refilled,  so  it could use the same bottles over
and over. So   they really  were recycled. But we didn’t  have the
green thing back in our   day.

We walked up  stairs, because we didn’t  have an escalator in  every
store and office  building. We walked to the grocery store  and
didn’t  climb into a 300-horsepower machine   every time we had to go
two blocks.  But she  was right.  We didn’t have the green thing in
our  day.

Back   then, we washed the baby’s  diapers because we didn’t have  the
throw-away  kind. We dried clothes on a line,   not in an energy
gobbling machine  burning up  220 volts  — wind and solar power
really did dry  our clothes   back in our early days. Kids got
hand-me-down clothes from  their brothers  or  sisters, not always
brand-new  clothing. But that  young lady is right.  We didn’t have
the  green thing back in our day.

Back then, we   had  one TV, or radio, in the house — not a  TV in
every room. And the TV had a  small  screen the size of  a
handkerchief (remember  them?), not a screen the  size  of the state
of Montana. In the kitchen, we blended and  stirred  by  hand because
we didn’t have electric   machines to do everything for us. When we
packaged  a fragile  item to send in the mail, we used wadded  up old
newspapers to cushion it, not  Styrofoam or plastic bubble  wrap.
Back  then,  we didn’t fire up an engine and  burn  gasoline just to
cut the lawn. We  used a   push mower that ran on human power. We
exercised  by working  so we  didn’t need to go to a  health club to
run on  treadmills that operate  on  electricity. But she’s  right.
We  didn’t have the green thing back    then.

We drank from a fountain when we were  thirsty  instead of  using a
cup or a plastic  bottle every time  we had a drink of water.  We
refilled writing pens with  ink instead of  buying a new pen, and we
replaced the  razor  blades in a razor instead of throwing away the
whole  razor just because the blade got dull.  But we  didn’t have the
green thing  back  then.

Back  then, people took the streetcar  or a bus, and kids   rode their
bikes to  school or walked instead of turning  their moms  into a
24-hour taxi service. We had  one  electrical outlet in a room, not an
entire   bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And  we didn’t
need a  computerized gadget to  receive a signal beamed  from
satellites 2,000  miles  out in space in order to  find the  nearest
pizza joint.

But isn’t it   sad  the current generation laments how wasteful we old
folks were just because we didn’t have the green  thing back  then?

Please forward  this  on to another selfish  old person who needs a
lesson in conservation from a  smartass young  person.
Remember:  Don’t  make old people mad.

We don’t  like being  old in the first place, so  it doesn’t take much
to piss us off.

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